Stick Sculpture

The materials for your next project are just lying on the ground.

The Stick Sculpture Of Patrick Dougherty

stick sculpture
Combining his carpentry skills with his love of nature, Patrick Dougherty began to learn about primitive building techniques and to experiment with tree saplings as construction material beginning about 1980. He quickly moved from small single pieces on pedestals to monumental site-specific installations. To date he has built over two hundred twenty such massive sculptures all over the world. His home base is his handmade log home in Chapel Hill, NC.

Dougherty uses locally-grown branches and often recruits locals to help complete his works. www.stickwork.net

stick sculpture
Close Ties, Dingwall, Scottish Highlands, 2006.
By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net
Photographer: Fin Macrae.

stick sculpture
Sortie de Cave/Free at Last,
Jardin des Arts, Chateaubourg, France, 2008. By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net

stick sculpture
The Summer Palace
Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2009.
By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net

stick sculpture
Call of the Wild
Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA, 2002.
By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net
Photographer: Duncan Price.

stick sculpture
Toad Hall
Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara, CA, 2005.
By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net

twig sculpture
Sittin’ Pretty
South Carolina Botanical Gardens, Clemson, South Carolina, 1996.
By Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net
Photographer: David Lewis.

twig sculpture
Patrick Dougherty. stickwork.net

stick sculpture
Roundabout
Tallaght Community Art Center, Dublin, Ireland, 1997.
By Patrick Dougherty. www.stickwork.net

stick sculpture
Crossing Over
American Craft Museum, New York, New York, 1996.
By Patrick Dougherty. www.stickwork.net
Photographer: Dennis Cowley.

stick sculpture
Around the Corner
University of Southern Indiana, New Harmony Gallery, New Harmony, IN, 2003.
By Patrick Dougherty. www.stickwork.net
Photographer: Doyle Dean.

The Stick Sculpture Of Jaakko Peru

stick sculpture
Ground Beneath, Oulu 1996 – 99.  9.5 m. By Jaakko Pernu www.environmentalart.net

Jaakko Pernu was born in 1958 in Kälviä, Finland. He currently lives and works in the city of Kokkola. “My working techniques are a direct continuation of the traditional Finnish itch for ‘hands-on’ methods, in which, in one form or another, materials derived from nature were always used. I feel that my completed works can be a part of the defined art world of galleries or museums; however, they can also be within reach of the so-called man in the street, who might bump into the artworks by chance along unfamiliar paths. In that instance, you could say that the intuitive ball of comprehension has been thrown to the viewer.” Some in process images here: www.environmentalart.net
stick sculpture
For the Big Family, 2006. By Jaakko Pernu. www.environmentalart.net

stick sculpture
Beacon, 2002. 4.5 m www.environmentalart.net

twig sculpture
Organ of Hearing, Fiskars 1999 – 03. By Jaakko Pernu  www.environmentalart.net

stick sculpture
Flux by Jaakko Pernu

The Stick Sculpture of Jenni Tieaho

Jenni Tieaho lives and works in Uusimaa, Finland. “My work tells stories about the Finnish forest, lakes, the mossy mountains and vast open fields, in an often folkloric, mystical and magical way. Pine needles, pinecones, hay, moss, the roots of plants or the tree bark weave into stories in which are hidden the powerful expression of nature. They express various human feelings, longing, closeness, hurt and belonging. Exploration and adventure are the making of art, also a part of me as a person. Art as a way of life is a playful interaction for human beings. It is a language with which I communicate with my own surroundings.” environmentalart.net

stick sculpture
Unen Silta by Jenni Tieaho. environmentalart.net

stick sculpture
Flame by Jenni Tieaho

tree bark sculpture
Tree Bark Snow Foals by Jenni Tieaho

stick sculpture
stick sculpture
Silent by Jenni Tieaho

More Fantastic Stick Sculpture

stick sculpture
The Nest by Nils-Udo.
Earth, stones, birch branches, grass, Lüneburg Heath, Germany, 1978. greenmuseum.org

stick sculpture
Listen…2003
Locally reclaimed birch logs, plaster hand casts,
9′ x 6″ x 16′ by Olga Ziemska.
olgaziemska.com

stick sculpture
Heartwood rabbit, 2011
Wood, adhesive, enamel, fiberglass by Olga Ziemska.
olgaziemska.com

stick sculpture
stick sculpture
By Jonathan Brilliant
The Goldsworthy of the coffee shop uses coffee stir sticks, the seven inch birch ones from Starbucks, which have the appropriate bend and weave-ability. “In his ongoing series of work, Jonathan continues to explore his sense that the coffee shop and related consumer environs are more organic and nurturing than the ‘real’ natural environment.” jonathanbrilliant.com

stick sculpture
stick sculpture
Jonathan Brilliant

No glue or other adhesive is used. The sculptures are created entirely in situ using only tension and compression, so therefore the pieces are not permanent. jonathanbrilliant.com

stick sculpture
Treehugger at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY.
Treehugger Project, by Agnieszka Gradzik and Wiktor Szostalo, is an ongoing work of environmental art made from twigs, branches, vines, and other natural materials in the shape of human figures hugging trees. The works represent the artists’ ongoing mission to help people rediscover their relationship with nature. pratt.edu
stick sculpture

Stillness by Olga Ziemska
olgaziemska.com

stick sculptures
stick sculpture
Otters Moors Centre, Yorkshire by Emma Stothard
northyorkmoors.org.uk

twig chandelier
Twig Chandeliers
By Deanna Wish Designs
New Castle, PA
Lots of styles to choose from: deannawish.com

Written by Keiren

Keiren is an artist who lives in New York City. A lover of animals, nature, science & green building.

13 Comments

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  1. The stick art was amazing and intrigued me to want to make something new myself. I have made ships and things from driftwood and absolutely loved this art. Thank you for the journey through them. Awoke my im.

    agination

  2. That is just so awesome – makes me want to go out to my ‘back 40’ and start collecting branches! What I have most is wild rose bushes – wouldn’t that be gorgeous! Sounds like a fun spring project to me. Thank you for the inspiration.

  3. Awesome. Motivational tool for my high school art students during the planning for a nature sculpture involving sticks and twigs.

  4. Unbelievable art form….can’t imagine how much time it must take to make any one of these creations!!!!! I love them all

  5. Unbelievable art form….can’t imagine how much time it must take to make any one of these creations!!!!! I love them all, Ya this coming from a retart.

  6. the organic forms reach deeply into my artistic core. I love them. My sculpture will change now that I have felt this work.

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