More stories

  • Ivory Trade Ban Won’t Cost Musicians Their Instruments… but Will Save Elephants

    Heard the one about the Obama administration wanting to confiscate musicians’ instruments when they return from international tours, auditions, etc.? If you’ve spent any time following right-wing media in April, you probably have… and not as a joke. Sites like The Daily Caller claim that the new regulations from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service […] More

  • Mardi Gras in New Orleans: Keeping the Commons Common

    By Beverly Bell March 4, 2014 Today, as on every Mardi Gras Day, New Orleans is in the midst of full-on mayhem. Depending on when on Fat Tuesday you are reading this, the Zulu and Rex parades are either lining up at their staging sites or rolling down the streets amongst crazed revelers. Mardi Gras […] More

  • Texas Pipeline Watch Trains Cameras on Keystone XL Pipeline South

    As we noted last week, the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline started transporting diluted bitumen (or tar sands oil from Canada) to the Gulf Coast on January 22nd. Activists did more than speak out: a new organization, Texas Pipeline Watch, announced its plans to “equip landowners and citizens with cameras to document every spill, leak, […] More

  • Harvesting Justice 28: Defending Indigenous Land & Water in Honduras – the Case of Rio Blanco

    On September 12, Berta Caceres, Tomás Gomez, and Aureliano Molina, leaders of the indigenous Lenca organization Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) must appear in court. Their charges? Usurpation of land, coercion, and causing more than $3 million in damages to DESA, a hydroelectric dam company. Berta, the general coordinator of COPINH and an internationally recognized social movement leader, is also facing separate charges of illegally carrying arms “to the danger of the internal security of Honduras.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 26: "They Fear Us Because We’re Fearless" – Reclaiming Indigenous Lands & Strength in Honduras

    Multinational corporations are moving into Central America to exploit gold and other minerals, rivers, forests, and agricultural lands. One area of high interest in the corporate feeding frenzy is the indigenous Lenca region in the southwest of Honduras. The government has given outside businesses concessions to dam, drill, and cut, in violation of national law and international treaties. More corporations have simply moved in on their own. More

  • Harvesting Justice 25: Without Our Land, We Cease To Be a People – Defending Indigenous Territory & Resources in Honduras

    “We live on the Atlantic coast of Honduras. We are a mix of African descendants and indigenous peoples who came about more than 200 years ago in the island of San Vicente. Without our land, we cease to be a people. Our lands and identities are critical to our lives, our waters, our forests, our culture, our global commons, our territories. For us, the struggle for our territories and our commons and our natural resources is of primary importance to preserve ourselves as a people.” More

  • 'Do the Math' Warns Climate's Doomed Unless We Act Now

    Do the Math” is a 42-minute documentary that dives into the causes of rapid climate change and blames the rogue fossil fuel industry as a main culprit to our atmospheric downfall. The film chronicles climate crusader Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, author, journalist, and founder of 350.org (the organization behind “Do the Math”) as he cultivates a global movement to change the terrifying climate crisis. More

  • Harvesting Justice 23: Inherit the Earth – Land Reform in Brazil

    In recent years, the voice and visibility of movements opposing land grabs and displacement, and demanding land reform, are increasing. Though relatively little land has been redistributed, organized movements of small farmers, indigenous peoples, and landless people are developing in size, strength, and organization. They are uniting across borders to break the nexus between land, agriculture, power, and profit. More

  • The Energy Game is Rigged: Fossil Fuel Subsidies Topped $620 Billion in 2011

    The energy game is rigged in favor of fossil fuels because we omit the environmental and health costs of burning coal, oil, and natural gas from their prices. Subsidies manipulate the game even further. According to conservative estimates from the Global Subsidies Initiative and the International Energy Agency (IEA), governments around the world spent more than $620 billion to subsidize fossil fuel energy in 2011. More

Load More
Congratulations. You've reached the end of the internet.