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  • It Will be the Bears, It Was Always Going to be the Bears

    This is it, kids. The apocalypse. Ragnarok. The rising of the Beast out of the sea … and, apparently, onto a Jet Ski. Whatever you call it, it’s finally happening, and it wasn’t the zombies. It was the bears. It was always going to be the bears, come to think of it. That the bears […] More

  • Harvesting Justice 13: We Have a Dream – Farm Workers Organize for Justice

    For decades, farmworkers – the more than one million men and women who work in fields and orchards around the country – have been leading a struggle for justice in our food system. They have been building awareness and mobilizing the public, successfully securing some rights, higher wages, and better working conditions. More

  • Harvesting Justice 9: Farmers and Consumers vs. Monsanto – David Meets Goliath

    Via Campesina, the world’s largest confederation of farmers with member organizations in 70 countries, has called Monsanto one of the “principal enemies of peasant sustainable agriculture and food sovereignty for all peoples.” See how peasant farmers, and the activists who support them, are challenging the agribusiness giant’s incursions into developing world farming. More

  • Harvesting Justice #5: Uprooting Racism in the Food System – African Americans Organize

    A shovel overturned can flip so much more than soil, worms, and weeds. Structural racism – the ways in which social systems and institutions promote and perpetuate the oppression of people of color – manifests at all points in the food system. It emerges as barriers to land ownership and credit access for farmers of color, as wage discrimination and poor working conditions for food and farmworkers of color, and as lack of healthy food in neighborhoods of color. It shows up as discrimination in housing, employment, redlining, and other elements which impact food access and food justice. More

  • Zero Waste: From Dream to Reality in the Philippines

    The city of Alaminos is pioneering zero waste in the Philippines with an energetic fusion of bottom-up planning and community participation. The outcome has been stunning: whereas in 2009 almost every city dumping field had a pile burning, there were almost none two years later. With sky-high waste separation and composting rates, Alaminos has become a trend-setter for other Filipino cities. More

  • Why Buy Local? Why Not? [Infographic]

    Feeling the need to do some holiday shopping over the next few days? No doubt, some will find Black Friday (or, shoot, Black Thursday now) deals too tempting to resist. But if you can wait a day, and focus your buying on small, local businesses on Small Business Saturday, you’ll avoid a lot of environmental impact, and do more good for your local economy. More

  • Learning By Doing: How to Teach Kids Respect for the Environment

    Chances are you are environmentally responsible to one degree or another. You recycle your trash, purchase energy efficient light bulbs, buy natural cleaning supplies, all with the goal of leaving the world a better place for our children. But one way to make a big impact that you might have overlooked is by encouraging your children to lead eco-friendly lives. By leading the next generation to understand and care about the environment as much as we do, you can help your children to grow up into environmentally conscious adults. More

  • Arab Grain Imports Rising Rapidly

    The Arab countries in the Middle East and North Africa make up only 5 percent of the world’s population, yet they take in more than 20 percent of the world’s grain exports. Imports to the region have jumped from 30 million tons of grain in 1990 to nearly 70 million tons in 2011. Now imported grain accounts for nearly 60 percent of regional grain consumption. With water scarce, arable land limited, and production stagnating, grain imports are likely to continue rising. More

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    Mobilizing for Environmental Change

    This post is my last of three entries for the World Environment Day blog competition. I am now a top ten finalist — every vote counts toward the grand prize of becoming the correspondent for WED2012 in Brazil!

    So you’ve decided to become an environmentalist. First, I think it is helpful to know that this label doesn’t have to come with a lot of baggage. I believe it represents a certain mindset or inclination toward feeling compassion for our planet. This is in contrast to the common misconception that environmentalism only includes those who take extreme action in the name of the environment, though these actions are certainly on the spectrum of environmental engagement. More

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    Would You Dumpster Dive for Food?

    Many dumpster divers utilize urban foraging as a sort of protest against the established corporate food system and as a means to eliminate unnecessary waste. Basically, it is the practice of sifting through trash (mostly commercial, sometimes residential) in search of salvageable food, clothing, and other discarded, but still useful, items. Dumpster diving is an intentional action against a materialistic and wasteful society. More

  • Good News about Soy and Deforestation

    Are you cutting back or cutting out your meat consumption partly because of the link between meat and deforestation? Studies have shown that soy production is also a major contributor to deforestation in Brazilian rainforests. Don’t give up the tofu and edamame just yet, though, because there’s more to this than meets the eye, and a recent report had some good news about this trend. More

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