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  • How to Eat Less for the Climate (and Your Health)

    We all know how to eat less and why it’s better for our health. It’s as simple as not taking another bite of cake. Or twenty. But even though we know how to eat less, we don’t often do it, especially this time of year when sweets and treats abound. But eating less is not just an issue about our preserving our waistline and reducing our risks of becoming obese or developing diabetes. It may also help reduce our impact on climate change and food waste. More

  • Clean Power Plan Needs Your Testimony

    While the EPA’s Clean Power Plan won’t solve climate change, it will go a long ways towards reducing US carbon emissions. Support it by adding your testimony. More

  • Top News from the Food Front: New Food Documentary, New Food System Foolishness

    Vermont boldly goes where no state has gone before, and food industry moguls mobilize to resist transparency. The USDA gets something right, surprising local food enthusiasts everywhere; and Katie Couric’s new documentary cheeses off the food industry’s obesity profiteers. Meanwhile industrial ag causes problems for bees, food eaters, and the whole planet actually. What else is new in the world of food? Glad you asked! More

  • Climate Scientists Declare "We are the 97%!"

    I have no doubt that climatology is a challenging field in and of itself, but climate scientists – particularly those focused on global warming – also have to deal with consistent attempts to undermine their credibility. They’re just following the “consensus” (which, ya know, didn’t actually result from empirical evidence) because it’ll get them grants, […] More

  • Climate Change Driving Weather off the Charts

    By Janet Larsen Meteorologists are calling the typhoon that slammed into the Philippines with 195-mile-an-hour winds on November 8, 2013, the most powerful tropical storm to make landfall on record. Super Typhoon Haiyan had gusts reaching 235 miles per hour and a storm surge swelling as high as 20 feet, so the destruction it left […] More

  • 10 Things to Know About Food on World Food Day

    Today is World Food Day. It offers the opportunity to strengthen national and international solidarity in the fight to end hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. With falling water tables, eroding soils, and rising temperatures making it difficult to feed growing populations, control of arable land and water resources is moving to center stage in the global struggle for food security. More

  • 'Do the Math' Warns Climate's Doomed Unless We Act Now

    Do the Math” is a 42-minute documentary that dives into the causes of rapid climate change and blames the rogue fossil fuel industry as a main culprit to our atmospheric downfall. The film chronicles climate crusader Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, author, journalist, and founder of 350.org (the organization behind “Do the Math”) as he cultivates a global movement to change the terrifying climate crisis. More

  • Fossil Fuel Use Pushes Carbon Dioxide Emissions into Dangerous Territory

    Since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels have grown exponentially. Despite wide agreement by governments on the need to limit emissions, the rate of increase ratcheted up from less than 1 percent each year in the 1990s to almost 3 percent annually in the first decade of this century. More

  • Long-Term Trends of Global Warming: Fact vs. Fiction

    The debate on global warming has been going on for over 25 years now. It is without doubt a hotbed topic for both environmentally conscious and big business manufacturing. The rhetoric being thrown back and forth has gone from discussion to polarizing debate to plain myth – from both sides. A look at the discussion based on some recent facts and studies is in order as well as a way to get past the rhetoric. More

  • science

    Where Has All the Ice Gone?

    As the earth warms, glaciers and ice sheets are melting and seas are rising. Over the last century, the global average sea level rose by 17 centimeters (7 inches). This century, as waters warm and ice continues to melt, seas are projected to rise nearly 2 meters (6 feet), inundating coastal cities worldwide, such as New York, London, and Cairo. Melting sea ice, ice sheets, and mountain glaciers are a clear sign of our changing climate. More

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