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  • Top News from the Food Front: GMO Bans, Paleo Nope, & Toxic Jerky

    DO NOT eat hummus or walnuts before reading about these ongoing food recalls — also avoid the ground beef. I know, I know, I always say that — but this time (in addition to many other good reasons!) it’s an e. coli contamination thing. The week’s food safety issues aren’t just bothering 2-legged diners: if you have canine friends, beware the toxic jerky! So, yes, the week’s news does feature some ickiness. But don’t be scared — there’s also some nifty GMO news, plus research on Paleo diets, cheap food, and obesity. Holy guacamole, but there’s much to report this week! More

  • Quinoa and Hunger: It’s All Politics

    Quinoa has become a super popular food in recent years, but it turns out this humble grain could be a key to addressing world hunger. Now we just need Bolivia to share! More

  • Will China Starve Itself Out?

    Are the rampant air pollution and recent droughts in China behind a massive grain purchase, or is that government stockpiling for worse that’s yet to come? More

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates, Chapter 6. Peak Water and Food Scarcity

    Editor’s note: We’re proud to support the Earth Policy Institute’s online publication of Lester Brown’s book Full Planet, Empty Plates by publishing selections from the book. If you missed other installments, you can find them here; we’ll add new ones every couple of weeks. By Lester R. Brown At the international level, water conflicts among countries dominate the headlines. […] More

  • Many Countries Reaching Diminishing Returns in Fertilizer Use

    By Lester R. Brown When German chemist Justus von Liebig demonstrated in 1847 that the major nutrients that plants removed from the soil could be applied in mineral form, he set the stage for the development of the fertilizer industry and a huge jump in world food production a century later. Growth in food production […] More

  • 10 Things to Know About Food on World Food Day

    Today is World Food Day. It offers the opportunity to strengthen national and international solidarity in the fight to end hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. With falling water tables, eroding soils, and rising temperatures making it difficult to feed growing populations, control of arable land and water resources is moving to center stage in the global struggle for food security. More

  • Healthy Soil: a Human Right? #BAD13

    Human rights assume an individual’s ability to take advantage of them… which is difficult if you’re hungry. So, for this year’s Blog Action Day, we’re thinking about soil health, which we think is critical to fighting hunger and supporting equal opportunity. More

  • Harvesting Justice 28: Defending Indigenous Land & Water in Honduras – the Case of Rio Blanco

    On September 12, Berta Caceres, Tomás Gomez, and Aureliano Molina, leaders of the indigenous Lenca organization Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) must appear in court. Their charges? Usurpation of land, coercion, and causing more than $3 million in damages to DESA, a hydroelectric dam company. Berta, the general coordinator of COPINH and an internationally recognized social movement leader, is also facing separate charges of illegally carrying arms “to the danger of the internal security of Honduras.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 27: The Ancestral Values We Inherited – Protecting Indigenous Water, Land, & Culture in Mexico

    “Within our indigenous community of Xoxocotla, we continue to hold the ancestral values we inherited. It never crosses our mind to leave them behind. Because in daily life we are always in contact with nature, with our lands, with our water, with our air. We live in harmony with nature because we don’t like the way that modernity is advancing, destroying our territory and our environment. We believe technological modernity is better named a death threat.”- Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales More

  • Harvesting Justice 26: "They Fear Us Because We’re Fearless" – Reclaiming Indigenous Lands & Strength in Honduras

    Multinational corporations are moving into Central America to exploit gold and other minerals, rivers, forests, and agricultural lands. One area of high interest in the corporate feeding frenzy is the indigenous Lenca region in the southwest of Honduras. The government has given outside businesses concessions to dam, drill, and cut, in violation of national law and international treaties. More corporations have simply moved in on their own. More

  • Harvesting Justice 25: Without Our Land, We Cease To Be a People – Defending Indigenous Territory & Resources in Honduras

    “We live on the Atlantic coast of Honduras. We are a mix of African descendants and indigenous peoples who came about more than 200 years ago in the island of San Vicente. Without our land, we cease to be a people. Our lands and identities are critical to our lives, our waters, our forests, our culture, our global commons, our territories. For us, the struggle for our territories and our commons and our natural resources is of primary importance to preserve ourselves as a people.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 23: Inherit the Earth – Land Reform in Brazil

    In recent years, the voice and visibility of movements opposing land grabs and displacement, and demanding land reform, are increasing. Though relatively little land has been redistributed, organized movements of small farmers, indigenous peoples, and landless people are developing in size, strength, and organization. They are uniting across borders to break the nexus between land, agriculture, power, and profit. More

  • Water Proof: the History and Future of Water Conservation

    For the developed world, water is a seemingly ubiquitous resource. Many Americans often take it for granted. Submerged in a culture of excess, it’s often difficult to keep one’s head above the waste. Water conservation is a murky subject for the average consumer. We’re often more likely to recycle than forgo filling our swimming pool. Thus, the history and future of conservation is worth examining. More

  • Peak Water

    All over the world, usable fresh water supplies are shrinking. Less and less water is available for agriculture, in other words, the food we eat. However, agriculture is often the lowest priority when governments allocate water. More

  • Peak Water: What Happens When the Wells Go Dry?

    Aquifer depletion now threatens harvests in China, India, and the United States. These big three grain producers together supply half of the world’s grain harvest. The question is not whether water shortages will affect future harvests in these countries, but rather when they will do so. More

  • Get Ready to Bust Some Heads: Population Growth Out-paces Global Food Production

    “Clearly, the world faces a looming agricultural crisis, with yield increases insufficient to keep up with projected demands,” says Jon Foley, author of a new study from the Institute on the Environment (IonE) at the University of Minnesota. What that means, basically, is that we’re adding people faster than we’re adding the ability to feed […] More

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