Get Crafty With Your Seed Labeling

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by Mike Lieberman

seed labeling with rocks

As spring approaches, itโ€™s time for us to start getting our supplies together to start our seeds. I am by no means as crafty as Eat Drink Betterโ€™s Becky Striepe, but I have plenty of ideas that can get the craft wheel spinning in your head.

You are definitely going to want to label your seeds. Not only does it make your garden look better, but it also makes it easier to identify what it is that you planted. We all think that weโ€™ll remember, but 20 minutes after we are done and out of the moment, we forget. Plus there is no reason to waste your memory on that info when you can easily write it down.

Last year, Becky shared the clothespin plant marker that she was using in her garden. Simple. Crafty and to the point. Here are some other things that you can use to help label your seedlings. Iโ€™ll share the base idea and you can decorate it to your liking.

Rocks

Iโ€™ve been using rocks as garden markers in my container gardens. You can easily find these either in your own yard or โ€œborrowโ€ them from a neighborโ€™s. The smooth gray ones are easy to write on and look stylish.

Be as generic as possible when writing on them though since it wonโ€™t erase.

Popsicle Sticks

You can buy these by the 100s in varying sizes at your local craft store. You can simply just write on the sticks or really creative with them. The choice is yours.

Plant Labels

Not feeling so crafty? Thatโ€™s ok this one time. There are plain plant label sets that you can purchase from online garden supply companies such as The Greenhouse Catalog.

There are also much fancier handcrafted designs that you can find on Etsy.

The above mentioned options should give you plenty of ideas to get you started to create your seed labels. What are you planting this year and how will you label your seeds?

Mike LiebermanAbout the author: Mike Lieberman is the publisher of UrbanOrganicGardener.com where he shows people with little to no land how to start growing their own food so they can avoid toxic pesticides, eat healthier and not feel limited by their lack of experience and space. Connect with Mike on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or at Urban Organic Gardener.

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