Make Iced Coffee At Home, Feel Heart Beat Out of Chest

I’m a coffee addict.  When it gets too hot in the summer, I’ll stop drinking hot and make myself some iced.  There’s several schools of thought on making iced coffee at home: some make regular hot coffee, then chill it, some pour hot over ice, some cold-brew.  In my younger, naive days, I would make hot coffee, let it cool, then chill it further with the addition of cold milk.   But wisdom–and experience–tells me that cold-brew is the path of least resistance and provides the best buzz for your buck.  Seriously.  You won’t go back.  And you can save a few bucks by making your own at home.  The all-too-simple directions, after the jump.

You need nothing fancy for this.  No french press, no percolator, just a large glass jar or similar container.  This is a small step towards conservation–no electricity needed except to grind your own beans, if you so desire.  Add to the jar a half-cup of your favorite (hopefully organic, free-trade) coffee beans, ground.  Fill the jar with water.  Shake that bad boy up.  Let it sit on the counter for at least 12, if not 24 hours.  When you want a cup, filter through coffee filter.  Cut with a little bit of cream or half-and-half, or do like I do and go 50/50 coffee and your choice of milk. The flavor of the coffee is more pronounced, more nuanced.  You taste what that coffee is supposed to taste like.

Hey, take it easy your first time.  This stuff can knock you on your tail.  You’re going to be feeling it if you suck down two of these in less than an hour.  I recently went to a new coffee shop in town and had two iced coffees in about three hours.  I was practically shaking when it was time to go.  I asked the barista about their iced coffee.

“Oh, we cold-brew.”

That’s what I thought.

Related Posts

How Eco-Friendly Coffee Makes a Difference

Black Gold: The Story Behind Your Morning Brew

Nude Kona Coffee Farmers Make Their Point, Naturally

Sustainable Sips

Photo courtesy of Jeff Kubina at Wikimedia Commons.

Written by kellibestoliver

6 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. I did this last year for my son’s graduation party. Maybe it’s because I was making enough for a crowd, but it took almost an HOUR to filter (time I didn’t have at the time)!

    I swore I’d never do it again, but you make it sound so easy, I might have to try again 🙂

  2. Thank you very, very much. What I found works for me was 1/2 cup coffee to 4 1/2 cups water but I’m still experimenting. One thing I found was to definitely filter the entire coffee after 12 hours or so otherwise its WAY too strong the next day (think road tar cut with cigarettes and you have a 1st order approximation of the taste).

  3. Hey, just an idea but what happened to good old cheesecloth, make a bag, fill it up with grounds and hang it inside the jar until ready to serve, no filtering needed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Eco-Libris: Can Wheat Straw Replace Trees as a Source of Paper?

California Farmers Using Unsustainable, Extreme Practices to Safeguard Crops from E.coli