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  • 2013 Marked the Thirty-Seventh Consecutive Year of Above-Average Global Temperatures

    By Janet Larsen Last year was the thirty-seventh consecutive year of above-normal global temperature. According to data from NASA, the global temperature in 2013 averaged 58.3 degrees Fahrenheit (14.6 degrees Celsius), roughly a degree warmer than the twentieth-century average. Since the dawn of agriculture 11,000 years ago, civilization has enjoyed a relatively stable climate. That […] More

  • Google Earth Maps Global Warming at the Local Level

    The University of East Anglia has teamed up with Google to make surface temperature data easily accessible. If you’ve ever wondered how much global warming has raised local temperatures in your area or elsewhere… More

  • Arctic Sea Ice Freefall is Mirror Image of Carbon Dioxide Ascent

    By Emily E. Adams The amount of Arctic sea ice has plummeted in recent decades—a bold manifestation of the rise in temperature resulting from the rapid increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. After staying below 300 parts per million (ppm) for some 800,000 years, the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere skyrocketed as […] More

  • As Sea Ice Shrinks, Arctic Shipping Options Expand

    By Janet Larsen and Emily E. Adams On October 7, 2013, the Nordic Orion bulk carrier ship completed its journey from Vancouver, Canada, to Pori, Finland, having traveled northward around Alaska and through the Northwest Passage. It was the first large commercial freighter ever to make the voyage through these typically ice-covered Arctic waters. Avoiding […] More

  • Healthy Soil: a Human Right? #BAD13

    Human rights assume an individual’s ability to take advantage of them… which is difficult if you’re hungry. So, for this year’s Blog Action Day, we’re thinking about soil health, which we think is critical to fighting hunger and supporting equal opportunity. More

  • Natural Pest Control: Using Bugs to Fight Bugs in the Wild

    Did you know that not every insect is a bug? A bug is a very specific kind of insect we call hemipterans, or true bugs. Following are the contributions of several insects that actually bug other bugs, providing a service that is so significant to humans, we should honor them with a national holiday. More

  • 'Do the Math' Warns Climate's Doomed Unless We Act Now

    Do the Math” is a 42-minute documentary that dives into the causes of rapid climate change and blames the rogue fossil fuel industry as a main culprit to our atmospheric downfall. The film chronicles climate crusader Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, author, journalist, and founder of 350.org (the organization behind “Do the Math”) as he cultivates a global movement to change the terrifying climate crisis. More

  • Harvesting Justice 19: "The Revolution is Going to be Fought With The Hoe"- Agriculture and Environment in New Mexico

    Miguel Santistevan and his partner Margarita García are helping youth reclaim knowledge about traditions behind lands and waters. Sol Feliz Farm, Miguel’s grandfather’s house east of Taos, is an acre of spiral gardens, rock gardens, and straight rows. The farm’s Agriculture Implementation Research and Education (AIRE) project is capturing the imagination of an impassioned group of youth in northern New Mexico. More

  • Long-Term Trends of Global Warming: Fact vs. Fiction

    The debate on global warming has been going on for over 25 years now. It is without doubt a hotbed topic for both environmentally conscious and big business manufacturing. The rhetoric being thrown back and forth has gone from discussion to polarizing debate to plain myth – from both sides. A look at the discussion based on some recent facts and studies is in order as well as a way to get past the rhetoric. More

  • Where Has All the Ice Gone?

    As the earth warms, glaciers and ice sheets are melting and seas are rising. Over the last century, the global average sea level rose by 17 centimeters (7 inches). This century, as waters warm and ice continues to melt, seas are projected to rise nearly 2 meters (6 feet), inundating coastal cities worldwide, such as New York, London, and Cairo. Melting sea ice, ice sheets, and mountain glaciers are a clear sign of our changing climate. More

  • What is Biodynamic Wine?

    Do you look for the biodynamic label when buying wine? Prbably not — it’s not nearly as well-known as other certifications. Guest writer Jess Spate explains biodynamics, and why wine makers have so readily adopted these practices. More

  • Family Planning Can Help Keep Our Lakes Blue

    A human population of 11 billion might turn Wisconsin’s gorgeous lakes green. Not green as in environmentally sound, but green as in covered in slimy, stinky, toxic blue-green algae. More

  • Arctic Sea Ice in Free Fall

    The North Pole is losing its ice cap. Comparing recent melt seasons with historical records spanning more than 1,400 years shows summer Arctic sea ice in free fall. Many scientists believe that the Arctic Ocean will be ice-free in the summertime within the next decade or two, and some say that this could occur as early as 2016. More

  • The Cleveland… Bears?

    This month, a young black bear was found in a tree outside an apartment building in Cleveland. While it makes for interesting headlines on the small scale, the competing interests of humans and animals on the global scale could spell doom for wild creatures. More

  • IBM Sets New Record for CZTS Solar Cells

    Most of today`s solar cells are based on silicon with extremely high purity, which is one of the major reasons why solar power is expensive. IBM has successfully created a new prototype of a solar cell that uses natural and abundant materials – copper, zinc and tin – to convert photons into electricity. More

  • Heat and Drought Ravage US Crops; Global Stocks Suffer

    This Summer’s heat and drought are showing their impact on US crops: September estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show 2012 U.S. corn yields at 123 bushels per acre, down by a fourth from the 2009 high of 165 bushels per acre. More

  • This Is Your Global Food Supply On Climate Change

    OK, I’m going to go out on a limb and say that I think that this year’s climate extremes are linked to human-caused climate change. We might not really have the definitive answer on whether that is true for 20 years, but I would like nothing better than to be proven wrong about the linkage I’m making today. From a global food supply perspective, the effects of weather on 2012 food production is problematic no matter what its cause. As bad as it seems, it might just be a “shot over the bow” relative to what me might expect in the future. More

  • Rising Temperature Raising Food Prices

    Over the last two months, the price of corn has been climbing. On July 19th, it exceeded $8 per bushel for the first time, taking the world into a new food price terrain. With heat and drought still smothering the Corn Belt, we may well see more all-time highs in coming weeks as the extent of crop damage becomes clearer. More

  • Limited Encouragement In The Latest Update Of The FAO Food Price Index

    Yesterday, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations released it’s monthly update on global food trade pricing. The overall “Food Price Index” that combines all categories did decline slightly, but less than the previous month. The index is still substantially higher than it was at a comparable period during the last cycle. More

  • Fish Pedicures: Experts Warn of Potential Health Risks

    Fish pedicures grew in popularity in the United States in 2008, but new findings about possible health and environmental effects are giving state and local governments reasons to take another look at the unusual spa treatment. More

  • Texas’ Dying Dolphins

    From November 2011 to this past March, 123 bottlenose dolphins were found stranded along the Texas coastline. Researchers are trying to determine the cause of this “unusual mortality event.” More

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