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  • City 2.0: Making Urban Centers Viable, Sustainable, Livable

    Think of cities as cesspools of crime and pollution? Or vibrant hubs of economic, cultural, and social innovation? New TED book City 2.0 shares the ideas of twelve thinkers on how we make the world’s cities – now home to over half of us – viable and sustainable. More

  • Harvesting Justice #5: Uprooting Racism in the Food System – African Americans Organize

    A shovel overturned can flip so much more than soil, worms, and weeds. Structural racism – the ways in which social systems and institutions promote and perpetuate the oppression of people of color – manifests at all points in the food system. It emerges as barriers to land ownership and credit access for farmers of color, as wage discrimination and poor working conditions for food and farmworkers of color, and as lack of healthy food in neighborhoods of color. It shows up as discrimination in housing, employment, redlining, and other elements which impact food access and food justice. More

  • Women’s History Month: Five Ways Women Are Changing the World

    Although this month is already underway, it’s not too late to join women all over the United States, United Kingdom and Australia in observing Women’s History Month. The 31-day celebration has been set aside to acknowledge and pay tribute to all women for their contributions throughout history and in society at large. We specifically celebrate those women working to make the world more sustainable. More

  • Harvesting Justice #4: Women’s Work – Gender and the Global Food System

    Women produce 60 to 80 percent of all food, both as subsistence farmers and as agricultural wage laborers. They are the primary providers for the majority of the world’s 925 million hungry people, obtaining food, collecting firewood and water, and cooking. And yet they have less access to land and the resources necessary to grow on it than their male counterparts. Inequitable distribution of land, labor, and resources leaves farming women triply burdened by work: in the fields, in the home, and in society. More

  • Harvesting Justice #2: Think Globally, Eat Locally

    Food sovereignty is rooted in the daily work of every small farmer, rancher, fisherperson, landless farm worker, and everyone else involved in local food production. Yet no matter what they produce, their ability to survive is affected by international market forces. The movement, therefore, also includes community, national, and international activists working for just trade and economic systems. More

  • Reduce Work Hours to Address Global Warming?

    Are our work schedules driving global warming? An economist finds that reducing work hours in the developing world could also lower greenhouse gas emissions… and maybe even improve American quality of life. More

  • Safe Bicycling in the City: the Green Lane Project

    Still a little nervous about bicycle commuting? You’re not alone. The Green Lane Project is a response to that fear: a campaign dedicated to creating safe, inviting spaces for bicycling and walking in urban environments. More

  • The Carbon Footprint of Santa's Trip Around the World [Infographic]

    Flying reindeer and a sleigh would seem like a pretty eco-friendly form of travel… but even Santa has a carbon footprint. Toys take energy to make, lumps of coal are carbon-intensive, and reindeer produce methane just like cattle. Here are some suggestions for St. Nick and team for cutting the environmental impact of their annual trip around the world. More

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