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  • 'Do the Math' Warns Climate's Doomed Unless We Act Now

    Do the Math” is a 42-minute documentary that dives into the causes of rapid climate change and blames the rogue fossil fuel industry as a main culprit to our atmospheric downfall. The film chronicles climate crusader Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, author, journalist, and founder of 350.org (the organization behind “Do the Math”) as he cultivates a global movement to change the terrifying climate crisis. More

  • Harvesting Justice 23: Inherit the Earth – Land Reform in Brazil

    In recent years, the voice and visibility of movements opposing land grabs and displacement, and demanding land reform, are increasing. Though relatively little land has been redistributed, organized movements of small farmers, indigenous peoples, and landless people are developing in size, strength, and organization. They are uniting across borders to break the nexus between land, agriculture, power, and profit. More

  • Why Vegan? Because Every Death Is a Tragedy

    Despite the big numbers, the awfulness of statistics of farmed and slaughtered animals is a matter of flesh and blood—an inescapable onslaught of pain, suffering, and thoughtlessness. The statistics become terrible every single day, whether we are standing in the midst of a slaughterhouse, or walking down a grocery store aisle, or watching a fast-food commercial on television. More

  • Harvesting Justice 21: Food for Body, Food for Thought, Food for Justice – People’s Grocery in Oakland, California

    The neighborhood of West Oakland in California has long been without a large grocery store, let alone one that offers healthy, fresh food. With unemployment at about 10% and nearly half the population of 30,000 residents living at or below the poverty line, West Oakland is a neighborhood that grocery store chains have claimed isn’t able to sustain a full-functioning store. People’s Grocery aims to prove traditional grocers wrong. More

  • buddhist monks children

    Five Environmental Lessons We Can Learn from Buddhist Monks

    My friend Julia recently visited Buddhist monasteries in Nepal and India and was deeply touched by the Tibetan Monks there. Living on less than a dollar a day, the monks she met were models of spiritual humility, happiness and simplicity. She came back from Nepal and the monastery full of life, and more dedicated than ever to service, simplicity, and meditation. In our discussions afterward, we reflected on the following 5 eco-themed lessons we could learn from the Buddhist monks. More

  • Harvesting Justice 20: More than Just Food – Connecting Farm to Community

    Just Food in New York City is doing what its name suggests: working to make the food system more just. It does this, first, by making community supported agriculture (CSAs), farmers’ markets, and gardens, more accessible and affordable in the city. Second, it helps small farmers survive, and even thrive, in the process. More

  • World Population Day: Let's Celebrate?

    On World Population Day, Population Connection president John Seager offers ideas on how we can turn this event from a day meant to raise concern to one for celebration. More

  • Harvesting Justice 19: "The Revolution is Going to be Fought With The Hoe"- Agriculture and Environment in New Mexico

    Miguel Santistevan and his partner Margarita García are helping youth reclaim knowledge about traditions behind lands and waters. Sol Feliz Farm, Miguel’s grandfather’s house east of Taos, is an acre of spiral gardens, rock gardens, and straight rows. The farm’s Agriculture Implementation Research and Education (AIRE) project is capturing the imagination of an impassioned group of youth in northern New Mexico. More

  • Art From Scrap: Ptolemy Elrington’s Hubcap Creatures

    Ptolemy Elrington makes sculptures from scrap material and runaway hubcaps. He lives in the British seaside town of Brighton, and has been crafting his Hubcap Creatures for twelve years. In this time Ptolemy has built a name for himself, and now there is enough demand for his work that he’s able to do it full-time. He is known for his animals, particularly fish, but can make just about anything, and sells to all kinds of people. More

  • Five Weird Ways to Go Green

    You care about the environment, you shop at farmers markets regularly, and you’ve even invested in low-flow toilets for every bathroom in your home. There’s more you can do… if you’re willing to get a little weird. More

  • Harvesting Justice 16: Putting the Culture Back in Agriculture – Reviving Native Food & Farming Traditions

    Native peoples’ efforts to protect their crop varieties and agricultural heritage in the US go back 500 years to when the Spanish conquistadors arrived. Today, Native communities throughout the US are reclaiming and reviving land, water, seeds, and traditional food and farming practices, thereby putting the culture back in agriculture and agriculture back in local hands. More

  • Mexico City Bed and Breakfast a Green Oasis

    Bed and breakfast El Patio 77 offers a sustainable getaway in the middle of Mexico City in a repurposed building replete with solar hot water, and other eco-friendly comforts. More

  • Harvesting Justice 13: We Have a Dream – Farm Workers Organize for Justice

    For decades, farmworkers – the more than one million men and women who work in fields and orchards around the country – have been leading a struggle for justice in our food system. They have been building awareness and mobilizing the public, successfully securing some rights, higher wages, and better working conditions. More

  • The History of Earth Day [Infographic]

    A little foggy on the history of Earth Day? Not a problem: our friends at Kars4Kids have put together a great infographic highlighting the major events leading up to, and since, the founding of this occasion. More

  • Harvesting Justice 9: Farmers and Consumers vs. Monsanto – David Meets Goliath

    Via Campesina, the world’s largest confederation of farmers with member organizations in 70 countries, has called Monsanto one of the “principal enemies of peasant sustainable agriculture and food sovereignty for all peoples.” See how peasant farmers, and the activists who support them, are challenging the agribusiness giant’s incursions into developing world farming. More

  • Falling Gasoline Consumption Means US Can Just Say "No" to New Pipelines and Food-to-Fuel

    Freeing America from its dependence on oil from unstable parts of the world is an admirable goal, but many of the proposed solutions—including the push for more home-grown biofuels and for the construction of the new Keystone XL pipeline to transport Canadian tar sands oil to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast—are harmful and simply unnecessary. Gasoline use in the United States is falling, and the trends already driving it down are likely to continue into the future, making both the mirage of beneficial biofuels and the construction of a new pipeline to import incredibly dirty oil seem ever more out of touch with reality. More

  • Baby Busts and Ponzi Demography: The Costs of Population Growth

    Worried about the “baby bust” under discussion in some media outlets? John Seager of Population Connection argues that there’s no shortage of people in the developed world (nor will there be), and that the “Ponzi demography” represented by such thinking is unsustainable. More

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