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  • Indonesian Clerics Issue Fatwa… Against Wildlife Trafficking

    No doubt you know some folks who, upon hearing the word “fatwa,” will say something about “damned terrorists.” Others might think of Salman Rushdie, and immediately equate the word with an assassination order. But, as Robyn Purchia from sister site Eden Keeper notes, a fatwa in Islam is merely a “call to action”; like other […] More

  • Sustainable Prison Rehabilitation Program Celebrates Years of Success

    Prison rehabilitation usually involves some combination of on-site work experience, and maybe some GED or college courses. But gardening? Dog training? Prairie restoration? Sounds like some social worker’s fantasy – right? Well, in some places, but in Washington State, the Sustainability in Prisons Program – a partnership with Evergreen State College – has over five […] More

  • Mardi Gras in New Orleans: Keeping the Commons Common

    By Beverly Bell March 4, 2014 Today, as on every Mardi Gras Day, New Orleans is in the midst of full-on mayhem. Depending on when on Fat Tuesday you are reading this, the Zulu and Rex parades are either lining up at their staging sites or rolling down the streets amongst crazed revelers. Mardi Gras […] More

  • How Does Wind Power Work? Hands-On KidWind Challenge Trains Students in Renewable Energy

    I’ve been passionate about educational programs for sustainability from sustainablog’s earliest days, so I wasn’t surprised at all to discover that I’d written about Minneapolis-based educational company KidWind way back in 2006. Founded by former science teacher Michael Arquin, KidWind has developed an impressive array of educational programming both for science educators wanting to introduce their […] More

  • Islamic Beliefs about the Environment

    I was thrilled when the folks at Important Media central announced the launch of Eden Keeper, a new blog about religion and the environment. While I’ve only recently returned to church, I’ve been fascinated by this particular intersection for years, and have really enjoyed the content published by Robyn Purchia and her team. I particularly enjoy […] More

  • Ich Bin Ein Gardener: Berlin's Urban Gardens

    Tomatoes, veggies and herbs are sprouting from Berlin parks, a shopping mall rooftop and even a former airfield in community gardens that pioneer farmers say add green spice to urban life. More

  • Is Car Ownership No Longer an American Rite of Passage?

    Reports from two different, respected institutions have been making waves in the automotive world for coming to the same conclusion; America, and the world, are past the point of automotive saturation, and rather than seeing sales expand, in a few short… More

  • Celebrating Sustainability Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges & Universities

    I was an assistant professor at an historically Black university (or an HBCU) back when I started sustainablog in 2003. As such, I’ve always had an interest in sustainability initiatives at these schools. Unfortunately, HBCUs tend to get overlooked when it comes time to put together those lists of top sustainability institutions. While some may […] More

  • "The Sun Rises, and the Sun Sets": 14 Religious Communities Using Solar Power

    If I asked you to provide a one or two word answer to the question “What do you call a group of people who live together, share work and living space, and power their lifestyle with renewable energy?” you’d likely answer with “commune,” or “ecovillage,” or maybe even “intentional community.” “Monastery” or “convent” probably wouldn’t […] More

  • The Invisible People Who Take our Trash "Away"

    Ever gotten stuck behind a garbage truck? Or heard one banging against a dumpster in the middle of the night? I’d guess that for most of us, these inconveniences/disturbances are among the few times we give any thought to the people who deal with our waste after we throw it “away.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 28: Defending Indigenous Land & Water in Honduras – the Case of Rio Blanco

    On September 12, Berta Caceres, Tomás Gomez, and Aureliano Molina, leaders of the indigenous Lenca organization Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) must appear in court. Their charges? Usurpation of land, coercion, and causing more than $3 million in damages to DESA, a hydroelectric dam company. Berta, the general coordinator of COPINH and an internationally recognized social movement leader, is also facing separate charges of illegally carrying arms “to the danger of the internal security of Honduras.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 27: The Ancestral Values We Inherited – Protecting Indigenous Water, Land, & Culture in Mexico

    “Within our indigenous community of Xoxocotla, we continue to hold the ancestral values we inherited. It never crosses our mind to leave them behind. Because in daily life we are always in contact with nature, with our lands, with our water, with our air. We live in harmony with nature because we don’t like the way that modernity is advancing, destroying our territory and our environment. We believe technological modernity is better named a death threat.”- Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales More

  • Harvesting Justice 26: "They Fear Us Because We’re Fearless" – Reclaiming Indigenous Lands & Strength in Honduras

    Multinational corporations are moving into Central America to exploit gold and other minerals, rivers, forests, and agricultural lands. One area of high interest in the corporate feeding frenzy is the indigenous Lenca region in the southwest of Honduras. The government has given outside businesses concessions to dam, drill, and cut, in violation of national law and international treaties. More corporations have simply moved in on their own. More

  • Harvesting Justice 25: Without Our Land, We Cease To Be a People – Defending Indigenous Territory & Resources in Honduras

    “We live on the Atlantic coast of Honduras. We are a mix of African descendants and indigenous peoples who came about more than 200 years ago in the island of San Vicente. Without our land, we cease to be a people. Our lands and identities are critical to our lives, our waters, our forests, our culture, our global commons, our territories. For us, the struggle for our territories and our commons and our natural resources is of primary importance to preserve ourselves as a people.” More

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