Book Review: The Homesteader’s Kitchen by Robin Burnside (plus vegan recipes!)

Have you ever found yourself overwhelmed by the abundance of the fresh food coming from your garden, CSA share, or farmers market?

If you want to learn how to turn summer’s bounty into wholesome meals, then Robin Burnside‘s new cookbook is for you.Β  The Homesteader’s Kitchen: Recipes from Farm to Table features more than 100 easy-to-follow recipes that harness the power of whole foods.

Here’s one of my favorite vegan recipes from the book: Indonesian Tempeh Sticks with Gado-Gado.

Indonesian Tempeh Sticks with Gado-Gado

From The Homesteader’s Kitchen: Recipes from Farm to Table by Robin Burnside

For family gatherings and summer barbecues, bake tempeh sticks or cutlets ahead of time and remove them from the oven when the marinade is fully absorbed, but before they begin to brown. When you’re ready to eat, lightly grill the flavor-infused sticks over the coals for a vegetarian protein offering. Make a big batch! These are very yummy morsels and everyone will want a piece or two – not only your grateful vegetarian guests. This is also an excellent marinade for grilled chicken, shrimp, or other meats – just omit the vegetable stock or water from the recipe.

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • 1/2 pound tempeh*

MARINADE

  • 1/3 cup tamari, nama shoyu, or soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon grated ginger
  • 1 teaspoon unrefined or toasted sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole or ground coriander
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons honey or agave nector
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chile flakes, optional
  • 1/3 cup vegetable stock or water
  • 2 cups Gado-Gado (see recipe below)

Cut the tempeh cake into 16 sticks, each one 1 x 2-inches and about 1/2-inch thick. Lay the sticks side-by-side in a 9 x 13-inch glass or ovenproof baking dish. Combine marinade ingredients, except for the vegetable stock, in a small bowl, mix well, and pour over the tempeh, wiggling the dish to evenly coat. Cover and let the tempeh marinade for several hours or overnight in refrigerator, turning the pieces over from time to time.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Pour the vegetable stock over the tempeh and blend it evenly into the marinade. Put the tempeh in the oven and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until most of the liquid is absorbed and the pieces begin to brown. Serve hot with Gado-Gado on the side. Store cooked and cooled tempeh strips in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 5-7 days.

* Tempeh soaks up flavors like a sponge, is easy to work with, and can be integrated into almost any meal as a substitute for fish, poultry, or meat as a vegan protein option. Cultured soybeans, usually combined with grains, land and sea vegetables, and other flavorings are fermented to create a cake that is then cut into strips, cutlets, or sprinkles, depending on what you’re making. This easily digested high-quality plant protein is simple to work with and ready to be transformed with your creative touch.

Gado-Gado

From The Homesteader’s Kitchen: Recipes from Farm to Table by Robin Burnside

Gado-Gado is a traditional Indonesian peanut sauce that perfectly complements grilled meats and seafood, tempeh, tofu, steamed vegetables, and fluffy jasmine rice. This is one of those sauces that “blooms” with age and is even better when made the day before you plan to serve it. With the addition of a little rice wine vinegar, Gado-Gado becomes a wonderful dressing for pasta, grain, and chopped veggie salads, or as a dip for Asian Salad Rolls (see page 85 in The Homesteader’s Kitchen) or Veggie Sushi Rolls (see page 102 in The Homesteader’s Kitchen).

MAKES 3 CUPS

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  • 1/4 cup minced shallots
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 (14-ounce) can coconut milk
  • 1 cup unsalted creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 2 tablespoons tamari
  • 1 tablespoon agave nectar or honey
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice or rice vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 cup vegetable stock or water
  • Pinch or two of cayenne
  • 1/3 cup chopped cilantro

SautΓ© the shallots and garlic in the coconut oil until translucent and put into a blender jar. Add the coconut milk, peanut butter, ginger, tamari, agave nectar, lemon juice, salt, and vegetable stock, and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into a double broiler, or place in a stainless steel bowl suspended over a pot of simmering water for 20-30 minutes to deepen the flavor, stirring often to keep from scorching. Remove from heat and stir in the cayenne and cilantro.

Here are some more highlights from The Homesteader’s Kitchen:

  • Refreshing, plant-based beverages like a Creamy Mango-Coconut smoothie and Hazelnut Hemp Mylk
  • Satisfying breakfasts – the Scrambled Tofu and Fresh Veggies is divine
  • Exotic soups like Sunshine Yam Soup with citrus and ginger (even the name makes me happy) and enticing sauces (I can’t wait to try the Chanterelle Gravy next summer)
  • Creative salads – the Kale and Sea Vegetable Salad with Sesame Citrus Dressing is a nutritional powerhouse
  • Fish, Poultry, and Meat Entrees, including delicious recipes for the grill
  • Nourishing vegetarian and vegan entrees (like the tempeh recipe above!)
  • Wholesome desserts like Date Nut Bars and Yam Candy

To purchase Robin Burnside’s book, check out Amazon or your local bookstore.

Like this book? You might also enjoy The Backyard Homestead by Carleen Madigan.

Image and recipes courtesy of Gibbs Smith Publisher.

Written by rachelshulman

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