More stories

  • herb garden

    Herb Gardening 101

    Planning and planting an organic herb garden is a traditional part of the homestead lifestyle goal of self-sufficiency. Growing rare and beautiful culinary and medicinal herbs is a glorious gardening experience. Herbs offer brilliant flowers, delightful fragrance, eye-catching foliage, and they are one of the easiest types of plants to grow. Think of the herbs […] More

  • mouse in grass

    7 Ways To Mouse-Proof Your Homestead

    For homesteaders, the common house mouse is one of the most troublesome of pests. A small brown or gray rodent with little beady eyes, large ears, and a skinny three to four-inch long tail, house mice flourish under a diverse array of conditions in and around homes, sheds, barns, and outbuildings. The unwelcome intruders consume […] More

  • natural skin care products

    All About Organic Skincare

    Organic and natural products are coming out of the shadow of mainstream beauty preparations, demonstrating likely and proven restorative results. Both women and men are more frequently choosing not to apply products with chemicals and possible noxious toxins that may irritate or damage delicate skin. Instead, they are opting to only use pure organic/natural preparations. […] More

  • brooms

    Growing Broom Corn

    If you’re getting through the long, dark days of winter reading the seed catalogs and dreaming of having your hands in the dirt, you may want to consider adding some new and visually exciting plants to your homestead landscape. Broom corn fits the bill. Native to Central Africa, broom corn, (Sorghum vulgare) a variety of […] More

  • carrots in burlap bag

    Growing Carrots

    Carrots are an easy-to-grow, easy-to-store root crop. Valued for more than a thousand years, the humble carrot gives color, texture, substance, flavor, and life to a diverse array of dishes. Serve grated to complement salads and sandwiches or chopped to add tone and substance to soups, stews, and casseroles. Sliced, steamed carrots, glazed with butter […] More

  • pug in garden

    Pet Waste Management Tips For Homesteaders

    Many rural homesteaders faced with a continual problem of dealing with pet waste, ask “can pet poo be composted?” The answer is a resounding yes. Dog poop can be easily composted in a backyard composter bin containing red worms where it is readily converted into rich compost. Composting pet waste prevents these materials from reaching […] More

  • Amazing Health Benefits Of Eating Fish

    Packed full of high-quality protein and low in saturated fats, fresh fish is an exceptional source of omega-3 fatty acids and essential vitamins and minerals including vitamin D, B2, calcium, zinc, iron, magnesium, potassium, and iodine. Extensive medical research studies support the American Heart Association’s recommendation of eating fish twice per week as part of […] More

  • gecko on planter

    Geckos In The Garden

    Do geckos call your homestead home? Household geckos are said to bring harmony, good luck, and good fortune to the household. Killing a gecko invokes an unhappy chain of bad luck events of long duration. If you have geckos in your garden, celebrate their presence but try not to invite them indoors. A small to […] More

  • diseased plant leaves

    What To Do When Plant Disease Attacks Your Garden

    No matter if it is viral, fungal, or bacterial, plant disease can enter your garden in a diverse array of ways. Many plant diseases are difficult to identify or to even to determine if what is attacking your plants is, in fact, a disease. Symptoms appear similar from bacterial to viral to fungal. Even insects […] More

  • plants in raised garden bed

    5 Ways To Prevent Plant Disease

    Any experienced gardener will tell you that when it comes to plant diseases, regardless of how much you weed, water, and worry, certain problems are beyond your control. There are, however, several things you can do to prevent or lessen the chance of plant disease in your garden. 1. Make Sure You’re Planting In The […] More

  • list of items titled 2018 goals

    11 Steps To Make Your New Year’s Resolutions Stick

    Face it, everyone is doing it. We feel compelled to join in the tradition of taking a good hard look at our lives, evaluating our faults and flaws, and making resolutions to start anew. We promise this will be the year we finally lose weight, get more exercise, quit smoking, and manage to drink less […] More

  • 13 Things You Didn’t Know About Onions

    We’re all familiar with onions, but with this tasty vegetable, there’s more than meets the eye. Read on to learn more facts about onions that you probably didn’t know! 1. Onions Played A Surprising Role In The Olympics In the first century, the Greek physician Dioscorides advocated a diverse array of medicinal uses of onions. […] More

  • ladybug on flower

    Attracting Ladybugs To The Homestead Garden

    Organic gardeners know that when ladybugs are abundant in the springtime, they can anticipate a bountiful harvest. Fortunate is the homestead blessed with an abundance of ladybugs. Ladybugs are guests you want to invite and keep in your garden. Read on to learn a bit about these beneficial insects, how to properly identify them, and […] More

  • bear at yellowstone

    Bear Awareness

    If you live alone, as I do, in a cabin deep in the woods, it is more than a bit frightening to hear noises in the night. Last year, on a cold and foggy morning in late November, I awoke to a loud thump on the porch. Startled, I stumbled from my bed, grabbed the pepper […] More

  • cows in pasture

    5 Questions To Ask Yourself Before You Become A Homesteader

    Are you tired of traffic jams and the fast pace of city living? Do you long to escape the rush and retreat to the quiet of rural living? If so, you are not alone. Each year, more and more people chose to leave the cultural amenities and conveniences of urban life to embrace a simple, […] More

  • three chickens looking towards camera

    Homesteader Tips For Dealing With Parasites

    How healthy is your homestead? When evaluating the health of your homestead, it is important to look at the whole picture. The condition of the soil, the health of the plants on your property, the water quality, as well as the immunity level and overall health of people, pets and livestock. If a problem is […] More

  • street covered in two feet of snow

    Tips For Surviving Winter’s Worst

    Winter blizzards can be life-threatening. Are you prepared to survive winter’s wrath? Millions of people in the United States live or recreate in isolated areas, away from the amenities of city services. If emergencies services are not readily available, self-reliance is required. In an emergency scenario, your life and the life of loved ones may […] More

  • close up on two pink/orange roses

    Growing Roses

    Roses are popular and beautiful flowering shrubs in many homestead gardens. However, starting a rose garden can seem like a bit of an intimidating challenge for new gardeners. It isn’t as hard as you might think. In fact, with planning and proper planting, most anyone can cultivate a successful rose garden. There is no argument […] More

  • house with fire in the background

    Homestead Fire Prevention

    Many people fail to realize that they face serious wildfire danger. However, if you live in the rural prairies, foothills, or mountainous regions of North America, you are at risk. Fire is frightening, unpredictable, and life-threatening. Weakness in your homestead’s fire protection scheme can create opportunities for a fire to take control, often because of […] More

  • Growing Elderberries

    A member of the honeysuckle family, the common elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadensis), also known as American elder, wild elder, sweet elder, dwarf elder, hairy blue elderflower, European elder or Tree of Music, is a dense, woody shrub. It grows wild across the northern reaches of the United States and in the southern provinces of […] More

  • beets and carrots

    How To Make Carrot Wine

    As a young man, my father was a homesteader who raised root vegetables to sell at the town fresh market. Even when the harvest was plentiful, there were always misshapen carrots, not attractive enough to appeal to what he called “picky city folk.” Dad stashed most of the rejects in the root cellar, to make […] More

  • dark brown uncooked wild rice

    Cultivating And Harvesting Wild Rice

    Wild rice (Zizania palustris) is known as the “caviar of grains.” Contrary to its name, wild rice is actually the seeds of wetland grass. Other common names include water oats, Canadian rice, marsh oats, and blackbird oats. A native, aquatic, ancient cereal grain that grows in isolated riverbeds, marshes, and shallow lakes across North America, wild […] More

  • Disaster Preparedness For Homesteaders

    Emergencies, by their very definition, are stressful. I, like many homesteaders, find myself concerned about the possibility of an emergency event such as a natural disaster, a disease outbreak, or an act of terrorism. Do you too, wonder if you have done all you can to help prepare for a catastrophic survival situation? Panic and […] More

  • pile of different varieties of squash

    Winter Squash Harvest And Storage Tips

    Why do homesteaders grow pumpkins or winter squash? While the process may be challenging, the reward could be enormous. There are dozens of varieties of pumpkins and winter squash, weighing from 2 lbs. to 500! What’s in your garden? Read on to discover harvest, curing, and storage tips for the seasonal vegetable that is the […] More

  • thimble berries in hand

    Cultivating Thimbleberries In The Homestead Garden

    Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus Nutt.) is a common bramble plant found growing in the wild on sunny, sub-alpine, mountainous slopes and avalanche tracks from Alaska to California. In fact, thimbleberries are a circumpolar fruit that grows wild in Japan and Russia and all but the most southern regions of North America. Red when ripe, thimbleberries may […] More

  • image of Aspergillus flavus under a microscope

    Household Mold Removal

    Gross, slimy, smelly, and dangerous to people and pets, mold is the last thing you want to see growing in your home. Mold won’t necessarily destroy your homestead, but it can make family members and pets sick while it makes your home, barns, outbuildings, chicken coop, root cellar, livestock pens, and pump house look awful […] More

  • Frugal Homesteading Tips For Stretching The Family Food Budget

    Many Americans experience the tight squeeze of tough economic times. In many parts of the nation, unemployment statistics may unexpectedly soar to an all-time high. When this happens, jobs are hard to find. If you are in a situation where you need to cut back on living expenses to stretch your budget, reducing the amount […] More

  • Bats Benefit The Environment—And Your Homestead

    Worldwide, bats receive an undeserved bad rep. If asked, most people worldwide will say they don’t like bats. Bats smell bad, they’re creepy, dangerous, and are typically portrayed as scary in numerous horror films. The majority of folks questioned would likely tell you that bats are “flying rats” that carry disease. Simply put, they are […] More

  • icicles hanging from a roof

    Preparing Your Homestead For Winter

    Freezing rain, sleet, high winds, heavy snow, ice, and extreme cold can present serious hazards, so it’s imperative that your homestead is ready. Whether or not you think it’s too early, it’s always a good idea to begin prepping your homestead for the winter. Preparation For Power Outages Cold temperatures and winter storms can be […] More

  • gopher poking head out of burrowed tunnel

    Rodent Control Without Poison

    As the weather starts to cool, rodents such as mice, rats, chipmunks, and squirrels attempt to find a warm place to stay well fed during the cold winter months. While these rodent pests are small, they can cause huge problems for homesteaders. Rodents contaminate food and indoor surfaces with salmonella and a diverse array of […] More

Load More
Congratulations. You've reached the end of the internet.