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  • Texas Pipeline Watch Trains Cameras on Keystone XL Pipeline South

    As we noted last week, the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline started transporting diluted bitumen (or tar sands oil from Canada) to the Gulf Coast on January 22nd. Activists did more than speak out: a new organization, Texas Pipeline Watch, announced its plans to “equip landowners and citizens with cameras to document every spill, leak, […] More

  • A Whole New Way to Think about "Paying with Plastic"

    The very best solutions not only come up with a brilliant answer to an important problem, but often manage to help address other issues too. Here’s one that seems to fit that bill, pointed out to us by Izabella Kaminska. It’s called Plastic Bank. More

  • Brighten Up Your Holidays – Sustainably – with LED Lights

    It all started with candles. The tradition of an illuminated holiday tree emerged around the 18th century, when wax candles were used to festoon the branches of fresh evergreens. Candles. The notion is somewhat terrifying today. But even those incandescent bulbs of childhood had their safety and practical drawbacks. The large glass bulbs would shatter; […] More

  • Nature-Based Business Accelerator Focuses on People, Planet, and Prosperity

    Sara Day Evans hopes to create more than new trends – she is creating a disruptive shift in the way business is done with better ways for us to prosper. She founded Accelerating Appalachia, the first Nature-Based Business accelerator of its kind in the nation, based in the beautiful Appalachian Mountains. Her program provides support to innovators who are solving environmental or social problems with programs with the capacity to scale. More

  • Tires Get New Life After the Road

    Both businesses and talented individuals have been making a positive impact in the number of tires that end up in landfills by using them to create stunning works of art, as well as useful items. More

  • Natural Pest Control: Using Bugs to Fight Bugs in the Wild

    Did you know that not every insect is a bug? A bug is a very specific kind of insect we call hemipterans, or true bugs. Following are the contributions of several insects that actually bug other bugs, providing a service that is so significant to humans, we should honor them with a national holiday. More

  • Harvesting Justice 28: Defending Indigenous Land & Water in Honduras – the Case of Rio Blanco

    On September 12, Berta Caceres, Tomás Gomez, and Aureliano Molina, leaders of the indigenous Lenca organization Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) must appear in court. Their charges? Usurpation of land, coercion, and causing more than $3 million in damages to DESA, a hydroelectric dam company. Berta, the general coordinator of COPINH and an internationally recognized social movement leader, is also facing separate charges of illegally carrying arms “to the danger of the internal security of Honduras.” More

  • Harvesting Justice 27: The Ancestral Values We Inherited – Protecting Indigenous Water, Land, & Culture in Mexico

    “Within our indigenous community of Xoxocotla, we continue to hold the ancestral values we inherited. It never crosses our mind to leave them behind. Because in daily life we are always in contact with nature, with our lands, with our water, with our air. We live in harmony with nature because we don’t like the way that modernity is advancing, destroying our territory and our environment. We believe technological modernity is better named a death threat.”- Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales More

  • Harvesting Justice 26: "They Fear Us Because We’re Fearless" – Reclaiming Indigenous Lands & Strength in Honduras

    Multinational corporations are moving into Central America to exploit gold and other minerals, rivers, forests, and agricultural lands. One area of high interest in the corporate feeding frenzy is the indigenous Lenca region in the southwest of Honduras. The government has given outside businesses concessions to dam, drill, and cut, in violation of national law and international treaties. More corporations have simply moved in on their own. More

  • Harvesting Justice 25: Without Our Land, We Cease To Be a People – Defending Indigenous Territory & Resources in Honduras

    “We live on the Atlantic coast of Honduras. We are a mix of African descendants and indigenous peoples who came about more than 200 years ago in the island of San Vicente. Without our land, we cease to be a people. Our lands and identities are critical to our lives, our waters, our forests, our culture, our global commons, our territories. For us, the struggle for our territories and our commons and our natural resources is of primary importance to preserve ourselves as a people.” More

  • Renovations Done Right: Tips for Dealing with Sticky Situations and Substances

    We all know that one of the largest costs of a home renovation is labor. Of course, the way to eliminate that is to do the work yourself. But when you’ve decided to perform a DIY renovation in the bathroom, what do you do when you run into hazardous substances or toxic materials? After all, any time you have water or moisture, you have the potential for mold or mildew, and plumbing that was improperly installed (or subsequently un-cared for) can be a breeding ground for nasty substances in and around your pipes and surrounding walls. More

  • 'Do the Math' Warns Climate's Doomed Unless We Act Now

    Do the Math” is a 42-minute documentary that dives into the causes of rapid climate change and blames the rogue fossil fuel industry as a main culprit to our atmospheric downfall. The film chronicles climate crusader Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, author, journalist, and founder of 350.org (the organization behind “Do the Math”) as he cultivates a global movement to change the terrifying climate crisis. More

  • Harvesting Justice 23: Inherit the Earth – Land Reform in Brazil

    In recent years, the voice and visibility of movements opposing land grabs and displacement, and demanding land reform, are increasing. Though relatively little land has been redistributed, organized movements of small farmers, indigenous peoples, and landless people are developing in size, strength, and organization. They are uniting across borders to break the nexus between land, agriculture, power, and profit. More

  • Water Proof: the History and Future of Water Conservation

    For the developed world, water is a seemingly ubiquitous resource. Many Americans often take it for granted. Submerged in a culture of excess, it’s often difficult to keep one’s head above the waste. Water conservation is a murky subject for the average consumer. We’re often more likely to recycle than forgo filling our swimming pool. Thus, the history and future of conservation is worth examining. More

  • The Web Isn't Green; Here's How to Surf More Efficiently

    We’ve all marveled at the power of the internet – how much it helps people and how much information it has made available to anyone with a connection. But few seem to be talking about how the internet is powered, or how consumers and developers can use less energy for their regular online tasks. More

  • Five Ways to Keep Cool this Summer (and Keep the Energy Bill in Check)

    Despite news of melting ice caps and dying polar bears, the first instinct for most people in the hot summer months is to crank up the air conditioning. While reducing carbon footprints may seem like an impossibly grand task, there are ridiculously easy ways to save on home energy consumption, as well as your monthly bill. Here are five ways to save energy this summer More

  • Harvesting Justice 21: Food for Body, Food for Thought, Food for Justice – People’s Grocery in Oakland, California

    The neighborhood of West Oakland in California has long been without a large grocery store, let alone one that offers healthy, fresh food. With unemployment at about 10% and nearly half the population of 30,000 residents living at or below the poverty line, West Oakland is a neighborhood that grocery store chains have claimed isn’t able to sustain a full-functioning store. People’s Grocery aims to prove traditional grocers wrong. More

  • buddhist monks children

    Five Environmental Lessons We Can Learn from Buddhist Monks

    My friend Julia recently visited Buddhist monasteries in Nepal and India and was deeply touched by the Tibetan Monks there. Living on less than a dollar a day, the monks she met were models of spiritual humility, happiness and simplicity. She came back from Nepal and the monastery full of life, and more dedicated than ever to service, simplicity, and meditation. In our discussions afterward, we reflected on the following 5 eco-themed lessons we could learn from the Buddhist monks. More

  • Harvesting Justice 20: More than Just Food – Connecting Farm to Community

    Just Food in New York City is doing what its name suggests: working to make the food system more just. It does this, first, by making community supported agriculture (CSAs), farmers’ markets, and gardens, more accessible and affordable in the city. Second, it helps small farmers survive, and even thrive, in the process. More

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