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  • Spinach, Lettuce Producers to Police Selves

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) continued a disappointing series of decisions today with its announcement it would likely establish a national marketing agreement that allows the leafy greens industry to develop its own food safety criteria. Mere months after signaling its intention to deregulate genetically engineered crops and potentially reverse the ban on Chinese chicken imports, the USDA is now allowing the industry that brought us E. coli-tainted spinach to police itself.

    This agreement allows industry to create its own production standards and creates USDA audits to verify that they are followed. More

  • Government Likely to Shut Down Food & Water Protections

    Whether or not Congress shuts down this week lawmakers will likely cut food and water protections, which could increase foodborne illness, cut badly-needed federal money allocated to maintaining our aging water infrastructure, and hurt the economy, according to a national consumer organization. More

  • ALERT: Washington Set to Make Our Food and Water Less Safe

    Leaders in Washington are proposing to cut food and water safety protections which would put more Americans in jeopardy of becoming sick or even dying from foodborne illness and would severely restrict the ability of municipalities to maintain their drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. More

  • EU Succumbs to U.S. Pressure on GM Contamination

    Today, the head of Brussels-based Food & Water Europe and Washington D.C.-based Food & Water Watch denounced a recent EU Animal Committee vote to permit animal feed contaminated with genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as β€œspectacularly shortsighted.” More

  • Congress Fails to Keep Dirty Factory Fish Farms Out of the Gulf

    This week, Congress is voting on the critically important and extremely timely β€œConsolidated Land, Energy, and Aquatic Resources Act of 2009,” (CLEAR Act). The stated purpose of the act was to promote clean energy while heightening safety standards surrounding offshore drilling and other problematic industries in the Gulf. Unfortunately, several important provisions, which would have furthered these stated goals, were dropped from the bill. The bill, which supposedly includes a Gulf of Mexico restoration program, would have banned the destructive and highly contentious practice of offshore aquaculture (also known as factory fish farming) in Gulf waters and would have promoted solar and wind energy on land. Unfortunately, Democratic leaders caved to political pressure and removed these significant provisions. One of the most serious, yet little-known threats to our oceans over the last decade has been the expansion of offshore aquaculture, so why is Congress allowing its creation in the already struggling Gulf? More