5 Winter Vegetable Recipes

carrots

Halloween isn’t even here yet and I’m already thinking about the winter vegetables that I can’t wait to cook up.  Something about these hearty vegetables makes me want to stay indoors, make copious amounts of delicious food, and enjoy the winter season.  Here are 5 winter vegetable recipes to keep you satiated through the long winter months ahead.

1. Carrots

Carrots contain Vitamins A, E, C, K, and B6.  They also contain potassium, niacin, and pholate.  Carrots can help regulate blood sugar, improve the appearance of skin, hair, and nails, and help promote colon health due to their fiber count.  Alton Brown has a delicious glazed carrots recipe that will surely make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

beets

2. Beets

Beets are rich in dietary fiber, iron, vitamin C, magnesium, and copper.  They help boost energy, combat anemia, and aid in digestion.  Beets are also good for aiding with liver function and blood circulation.  Sassy Radish gives us an easy and healthy beet salad recipe great for any meal.

parsnips

3. Parsnips

Parsnips provide an excellent source of vitamin C, fiber, folic acid, and copper.  They are also a good source for niacin, magnesium and potassium. The health benefits are similar to that of the potato except they are lower in calories and contain more fiber.  This parsnip chip recipe from All Recipes would be perfect for a healthier winter snack.

rutabaga

4. Rutabaga

Rutabaga is believed to be a hybrid of the turnip and some form of cabbage.  It belongs to the same family as kale, brussel sprouts, and cauliflower.  Rutabagas are a good source of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C.  It is also an excellent source for potassium, which is known to help lower high blood pressure.  Smashed Rutabagas with Ginger Roasted Pears on Epicurious sounds like an oh-so delectable recipe for a chilly night in.

Brussels sprouts

5. Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts contain one of the highest amounts of vitamin C  in any vegetable.  These little gems also contain folic acid, are high in antioxidants, and are high in protein making them a delicious meat alternative.  Brussels sprouts also provide protection against inflammatory diseases like arthritis.  These little guys have long been known as one of the more under-appreciated vegetables.  This Golden Crusted Brussels Sprouts recipe on 101 Cookbooks guarantees that it will turn long sprout haters into lovers!

Do you have any favorite winter vegetable recipes you would like to share?  Winter is coming up quick, and I would love to have a stock-pile of delicious recipes in my arsenal!  Feel free to leave your ideas and links in the comments.

Image Credits:
Carrots. Photo by GNIKRJ via Flickr Creative Commons
Beets. Photo by sassyradish via Flickr Creative Commons
Parsnips. Photo by anneinchicago via Flickr Creative Commons
Rutabags. Photo by jodigreen via Flickr Creative Commons
Brussels Sprouts. Photo by E>mar via Flickr Creative Commons

Written by Maria

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